One Day At A Time and What It Means To Me

One Day At A Time and What It Means To Me

Disclaimer: First and foremost, because there has been some confusion, I just want to set the record straight and mention that I am not Latinx. I married someone who is, and that is where my last name comes from. It does not bother me that I am confused as someone who is, except that I refuse to falsely portray the narrative of someone I am not. To me doing that is the same thing as stolen valor, which is not okay either. So with that being said, I will continue this ramble.

As a good portion of the universe knows at this point, Netflix announced on Thursday, March 13th, 2019, that it cancelled One Day At A Time. To say that I am heartbroken is probably an understatement, to be honest. This show means so much to my family of three, who have two Latinx individuals in it, excluding myself, as I am Caucasian. However, in a show that was made primarily for Latinx people, I still see myself in the character of Syd, who is the only Enby I have ever encountered in on screen media. Being able to see myself, but also the fact that others found representation for their own lives, is why I am distraught at this decision.

In a world where there seems to be so much geared toward those who are not only straight, but also cisgender persons, finding someone who is transgender on television, much less almost exactly like me, was a profound moment. Likewise, to see someone with not only the same gender as me, but the same pronouns, was life altering. I cried over it, to be honest, because I never thought I would see the day when that would happen. So much of my viewing experience has surrounded seeking myself out in people who are only similar to me in certain aspects. At least that was the case, until Syd. Now that I have experienced this, I am only more insistent that it not be the last time I, or other enbies alike, do.

Whether Lin-Manuel Miranda and every other person who has pitched in pulls off saving this beloved show or not, I will be forever grateful that it allowed me to see myself in a positive light, through the inclusion of Syd. The script could have easily been written differently, as has been done many times before. I can only hope that the networks who may be considering picking up the show understand that beyond Syd, there is so much more to love about One Day At A Time, and that it deserves to dance its way into the hearts of more people for years to come. For now though, all we can do is take life as it comes – one day at a time.

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The Diviners: A Book Review

The Diviners: A Book Review

Small-town hellcat turned New York City flapper, Evangeline O’Neill introduces each reader to her world in Libba Bray’s novel The Diviners with equal amounts of spunk and quick wit. However, though she leads us in, throughout the story, those who choose to pick up this treat of a novel are given insight into not only her life but those of a host of other characters introduced within its pages. In short, I took pauses in my reading of this book only when necessary. Were I not held back by time constraints, I would have completed this tome in one sitting.

To give a little back story, our main heroine has been sent to New York City by her parents to live with her Uncle Will who is a bachelor, museum owner and professor to boot. Not long after Evangeline’s, or Evie’s arrival, a brutal murder kicks off Evie’s involvement in aiding her uncle and the police solve an investigation into who could have done it. Delving further, it becomes apparent at separate points to most involved, that this case is not a typical whodunnit, and that Evie’s supernatural power could be the key that is necessary to close this case.

As mentioned above, Evangeline is the star of the show in every sense of the word. Her character, though brash and outspoken, has a certain flair to her that cannot help but leap off of the page. Throughout my reading of this book, though I enjoyed every single character, she was the one who stole my heart. Not only is she the take-charge sort, but she also has depth, despite her less than desirable attributes, such as her inability to see past the next party at certain times, or her narrow-minded view of what she should be concerned with. She is by no means perfect, but no one person or character ever is.

With regards to the rest of the cast of characters, no matter how small or large a part they may have played, each one had a fully fleshed out persona which made them feel as if they were real people being written about. Diversity was woven in with ease, with little fanfare. Inasmuch, each held a significance to the story in some way, and although they may not seem to at certain portions throughout the book, eventually each loose thread is tied up, and their importance revealed.

Speaking of loose ends, as far as the technical aspects of storytelling – such as plot, world-building, and pacing – I felt each was executed well. Given that Mrs. Bray wrote from the perspective of an array of various characters throughout the course of this novel, I was impressed at how well she weaved their lives, stories, and character arcs together. Likewise, the world-building and plot were each intriguing enough to keep this reader engaged until the very last word.

Overall, I could not have asked for more from a YA Fantasy book. All of the elements of this story combined made for a fantastic novel. It was, as Evie says, “The cat’s meow.”

I rate this novel 5/5 stars.